UMass Law earns full ABA accreditation

by Arpeni Mael, Editor-In-Chief The UMass School of Law has earned full accreditation by the American Bar Association (ABA). This is a major milestone for the Commonwealth’s only public law school. In a press release by UMass Dartmouth, UMass President Marty Meehan said, “Full ABA accreditation of the UMass School of Law means that Massachusetts now offers its residents a public, in-state legal-education option that … Continue reading UMass Law earns full ABA accreditation

Looking back on the Obama Administration

by Nicole Belair, Staff Writer Even if you haven’t agreed with some of President Obama’s plans and policies throughout the past eight years, I think we can all agree that he’s a pretty cool guy. We’ll miss his dad jokes, mic drops, and his appearances on Jimmy Fallon to read thank you letters. And of course, nothing beats the pictures of him and Michelle handing … Continue reading Looking back on the Obama Administration

Election recounts are the product of desperation

by Sebastian Moronta Blanco, Staff Writer Because the details surrounding the recounts have been covered in another section of this issue, I’ll advise anyone who isn’t familiar with them to refer to that article before reading mine. Jill Stein, the 2016 candidate for the Green party, has been spearheading the recounts in Michigan, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania, three of the nation’s “battleground” states. She’s made the … Continue reading Election recounts are the product of desperation

Christmas is more commercialized than ever

by Nicole Belair, Staff Writer Christmas used to be about much more than Black Friday shopping, overspending on gifts, and wishing for the coolest new gadgets. It’s hard to believe that Christmas was ever free of capitalistic corruption. It wasn’t always focused on consumers, but rather on religion and pure holiday wonder. In the nineteenth century, Christmas consisted of church services and occasionally a large … Continue reading Christmas is more commercialized than ever

A bachelor’s postscript

by Matthew Litchfield, Contributing Writer I guess it’s time to say goodbye, though it hardly feels real. I’m graduating a semester early—while I’m certainly not alone, the seeming lack of precedent is numbing. It’s sad, really, that my situation is as unique as people think it is. I know people who have graduated from this school up to a year early—and yet I still hear … Continue reading A bachelor’s postscript

Castro’s death and what this means for Cuba

by Zack Downing, Staff Writer Dating back to the reign of Fulgencio Batista, Cuba has historically been a communist nation neck deep in turmoil and suffering. Most Americans know Cuba for their missile crisis, their cigars, and their Area 51-like restriction to visitors. However, the name that comes to mind when most people think of Cuba is the bearded dictator Fidel Castro, who rose to … Continue reading Castro’s death and what this means for Cuba